Why Brexit Scares Me as a Chronically Ill Person

Brexit is looming (maybe, unless it’s delayed) and there are many stories in the press about medication shortages and disruption to food supplies. Some of it is undoubtedly scaremongering tactics, but some of it isn’t. And we’re obviously not going to know either way until it happens.

No one wants their medication supply interrupted. At the very best, it’s an inconvenience and bothersome symptoms will come back. But for people like me, it’s literally a matter of life or death.

There is a huge difference between not having a medication which keeps you healthy and one which could lead to death. People take many medications which prevent the potential of complications leading to death, ranging from tablets for high blood pressure to ones for depression. But for some of us, that one specific medication keeps us alive and we can’t miss a dose.

For example, I have asthma. If I don’t take my inhalers, my asthma will get worse, but I probably won’t die immediately from it. In the event of this medication being unavailable, I could be really diligent about avoiding my asthma triggers, stay indoors, not do any type of exercise, avoid stress… there are lots of things I could do to prevent an attack. If I did have an asthma attack but my inhalers weren’t available, I could go to hospital where I could be given something like a saline neb which wouldn’t cure it, but would help. Or I could be given an alternative treatment only available in hospital. Or even put on oxygen or intubated. If my heart stopped, I could be resuscitated.

(Can we all just pause for a second and recognise how absolutely ludicrous that I’m even writing this post and thinking about it? Regardless of whether you voted for brexit or not, the fact this is even a potential problem is stupid.)

I also have adrenal insufficiency. If I don’t take my hydrocortisone I will die. End of story. Nothing I do will prevent this, even if I didn’t get out of bed. If I go to the hospital and they don’t have it either, I will die. There isn’t an alternative I can be given. It doesn’t matter how much you try to resuscitate me if my heart stops, without that specific drug, I will die. The same applies for other endocrine illnesses like diabetes.

I’m sensing some people are reading and are rolling their eyes at my dramaticness or thinking it’s scaremongering. Firstly, that’s not an over dramatisation, it’s fact, secondly, here’s what I know (factually):

– this is one of the drugs which has been cited by doctors as a shortage drug in the event of no deal brexit

– guidelines issued to GPs say stockpiling of these drugs isn’t necessary because they’re written by people without knowledge of how important it is to people like me (hydrocortisone is used for many things and it’s not essential for life in the majority of cases. But it is for me)

– pharmacies have already had problems getting in this drug for me as it is from various suppliers, due to nationwide shortages

– the brands of hydrocortisone I can take have been at the centre of a court case because of them cutting a secret deal and trying to outprice each other on the market. It’s been in the news.

– currently I can only take 1 brand due to the way the compound is mixed, the fact I have to take 2.5mg doses and the NHS not prescribing anything less than a 10mg tablet. In other words, all brands except one can’t be split into quarters. So I’m already really limited.

Some people might also be thinking that the worst case scenario is that there’ll be a delay at customs, so it’ll be late but available. But I don’t have the luxury of delays, because missing just one dose can kill me. Here’s why medication supplies might be interrupted:

– customs slow things down meaning medication distribution to pharmacies is slower

– once they arrive in the U.K., they have to go to the wholesaler who then distributes to pharmacies and hospitals.

– wholesalers can prioritise where they send their medications to, but they’re going to prioritise hospitals first (this has already happened). And also, remember these are businesses so their ultimate goal is to make money, not keep people alive. What would you do if you knew something was going to be in short supply? Hike the price up! And likewise for the people exporting to us. So suddenly it could be a question of who can pay for medications. Hydrocortisone already costs £90 per box. I need 3 of those per month minimum.

– pharmacies have quotas (like rations) of what they can order. So they’re not necessarily allowed to order lots of boxes of the same thing. What if some pharmacies have more demand than others?

– then there’s logistics- if a lorry has been delayed at customs, it’s then not able to make a return trip as quickly to get more deliveries. And those kind of logistics have knock on effects which can take weeks to resolve

I don’t have weeks. And also consider the following; perhaps it’s too much disaster programmes on Netflix, but I know how it goes down in a real crisis. Doctors will save the most amount of people with the fewest medications possible. Like a game of chess. I require my meds every 6 hours but, like I said, hydrocortisone is used for lots of things from allergic reactions to respiratory problems. In a lot of cases, people only require short courses of it and will resume normal life but I’ll need it long term. If you can save 7 people with a week’s worth of my drugs but sacrifice me, what would you do? Clearly you opt to treat the 7 people over one person. It’s obvious. But it’s not great for me, because without that drug, it’s a death sentence.

So yes, it might all be fine and the disruption might be minimal. But if it’s not? How would you feel if you knew that missing one dose could be fatal? And that’s just the drug which keeps me alive, I take 18 other ones each day which alleviate my otherwise debilitating symptoms. What about all of those? They won’t kill me straight away if I don’t take them, so I’m less worried. But, again, how stupid is it that I’m being forced into a position of thinking that?

Anyway, here’s what I’ve been doing about it, because I realise I might have freaked some people out and there are ways I can prepare:

– I contacted my GP to put in place a 2 month supply I can keep at home and a 6 month prescriptions order which can go to the pharmacy (this is what Addisons U.K. recommend) . 2 months at home should cover me for any supply disruptions and 6 months advance on prescriptions means that the pharmacy can order in advance which will help them with their quota- they’ve got the order from the doctor, it’s not just a vague request

– I’ve already got some backups at home just in case the GP has issues sorting this out for me. The issue being what I mentioned above in that it’s not a problem for most people not having hydrocortisone but it is for me. The GP surgery can only do what they’ve been authorised to do by the higher up people

– avoiding Brexit talk and drama where I can so I don’t get stressed out by it

– making sure I don’t have anything ‘big’ planned around that time so that I can keep as well as possible (ie leaving the house to do ‘life’ things means increasing my dose which I won’t necessarily have the luxury of doing if there are supply issues)

I’m really practical about having AI and all of it’s near-death encounters it has thrown at me, so I wouldn’t be saying this just to have a dig at people who voted leave. I’m also intelligent enough to be able to check sources of publications for reliability and fact checking. Aside from that, this is what the big charities for my illness have told us patients. I’d be stupid to ignore their advice.

And this is just me, it’s a bigger problem than that. People wouldn’t have access to cancer treatments, the flu vaccine won’t be as readily available and this year’s flu is supposed to be tough, and services which are usually stressed over winter are going to face bigger problems if people with long term health conditions don’t have access to their meds.

If I haven’t managed to convince you that there’s a reason for me to feel scared about brexit then I doubt I ever will. And the whole ‘it might get delayed’ thing doesn’t help because it just shows how incompetent our country seems to be in organising anything. But whichever way you look at it, I’d like to hope that 52% of the country wouldn’t have voted leave if they’d known that there was the potential of people dying because of politics.

I’ll leave you with this tweet:

One thought on “Why Brexit Scares Me as a Chronically Ill Person

  1. Holly Shaltz says:

    Please contact me privately if you need more HC. I have some to spare. It would come from the US, so allow time. We can make this work, and it’s worth it to give you the assurance you need that your supply won’t be interrupted before things are sorted.

    Holly

    Like

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