Illness Burnout

Everyone knows you can get burnout from working too hard, being exhausted from looking after the kids, exercising too hard… but did you know you can get burnout from having a chronic illness?

It’s not so much the ones you have to manage by taking meds a few times a day, that’s not really that big a deal and takes maybe 2-3 minutes per day, with a bit more input if you get flu or something. It’s more the illnesses which need constant maintenance and monitoring and which impact massively on your life.

It’s bloody knackering. It’s like having a pet or a child but never getting the good bits. And unlike a pet or a child, you can’t have ‘me time’ or leave them with the grandparents for the weekend. There’s always a big part of you which wants to say ‘f*** it, I’m not dealing with this today’, but you don’t get that choice if the end outcome is death.

Here are some of the things that make me feel burnt out with my adrenal insufficiency sometimes:

1. By far the one that annoys me the most day to day is following a medical low carb diet. It’s supposed to make me feel better, help me lose weight and lower my cholesterol. But it doesn’t. So what’s the point in doing it. Why can’t I eat what I want?! The diet itself isn’t the hard bit, it’s the guilt that comes with it, that I must be ‘doing it wrong’ since it’s not working.

2. Keeping records and diaries. If there’s a medical app for it, I probably have it. The only way I can prove to my doctors that I am actually doing what they tell me or that I’m not fabricating my weird quirks is by documenting everything. So everything I eat and drink is recorded along with physio, blood pressure, blood sugar, temperature, how often I need to go to the toilet, sleep, changes to my meds… everything I do is recorded because no one knows what’s relevant and what’s not until they see it. It’s time consuming and annoying and depressing all at the same time. And it makes you obsessive.

3. Doing a lot of maths. Grams per carb per serving, timing blood sugar readings, working out my steroid doses daily, making sure I have enough meds so I don’t run out, organising said meds.

4. Constant monitoring or reflecting to make sure the maths stays right. You can work out your steroid taper plan at the start of the week but have something happen which scuppers it and have to do it alllll again. And stabbing your finger multiple times a day to check your sugar level is never fun.

5. Going to appointments. I see my chiropractor staff more than I see my mum. Hours waiting in hospital waiting rooms, travelling to appointments, mostly to be told ‘nope we still don’t get it, do this test then come back’.

6. Having to chase people. The NHS computer officially hates me. Something to do with when I changed my name after getting married (3 years ago) means that it tells people I’ve been referred for an appointment but it never actually completes the referral. But everyone thinks it has. And then it refuses to let itself be overridden! Aside from that, I spend a lot of time talking to people and being the point of liaison between departments.

7. Having to argue with people. This is a particularly horrible one. I spend a lot of time arguing with people to get my correct treatment. I’m not wanting anything extra to the protocol, the problem is some people are unwilling to acknowledge they don’t know the protocol so refuse outright. There have been a few times where I’ve thought ‘why the hell am I arguing for a prescription which keeps me alive when no one here seems to care if I live or die? Maybe I should just give in’. That’s a particularly dark place to be in and takes a lot of coming back from.

8. Monotony. It’s so boring living with the same routine. But it’s hard being spontaneous when you have naps, meals and tablet schedules.

9. Restrictions. I’m not allowed to drive, I can’t walk far at all, I can’t really go out by myself because of those reasons and I can’t stay by myself for long periods of time. As well as the physical things I can’t do but I can’t be bothered writing. I’m proud of myself when I make myself a cup of tea!

10. Fear of missing out. Everyone has this to an extent, but when you physically can’t do things or have to live so rigidly you spend a lot of time thinking about things which might have been were you not sick.

11. Always having to be prepared. Might seem like fun when you’re in the scouts, but being prepared for any medical emergency is a giant pain. It’s not wallet, phone, keys when I leave the house, it’s emergency injection, phone, pill bag and testing kit. And many snacks.

12. Having to field unwanted advice. People are trying to help. It’s with good intentions. But it’s never nice feeling like someone thinks you’re not ‘trying hard enough’ if they catch you on a burnout day.

13. Having to constantly think about it. I don’t actually want to think about it all the time, but there’s a lot of ‘if I do that will X happen’ or ‘is it nearly tablet time’ thoughts. Pretty much every few minutes because that’s how often my symptoms all shift around.

I haven’t actually come up with a solution for feeling burnt out about illness, except you have no choice and have to get on with it and hope that things will get a bit easier at some point. Self care is important, but sometimes you’re too worn out even for that! People bring new parents food and useful presents- maybe there’s a chronic illness version of those?! 😉

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