‘Stressful’ Situations

This is a really hard one for people who don’t have Adrenal Insufficiency to understand and empathise with. And, to be honest, I would have struggled to before diagnosis too. A stressful situation for me is not the same as for other people. No amount of ‘getting a grip’ will help me. I can’t mind over matter it. 

The first thing to appreciate is the fact that stress has both a psychological and physiological response in humans. So in a ‘normal’ person, they might experience psychological symptoms of anxiety, nervousness, low mood, irritability or emotional outbursts if they are under a lot of stress. And these symptoms, if not dealt with over time can manifest physiologically in the form of visual disturbances, migraines, stomach ache, vomiting, cramps, shakes and tremors, dizziness… The list is different for every person. However, because of the way our fight or flight mechanism works, the initial psychological response to stress and the adrenaline release allows people to function better temporarily in order to get past or overcome the stress at hand. It’s what helps you run away from a bear and climb a tree if you need to. So people can achieve a lot while they’re at work but then feel absolutely knackered as soon as they walk through the door. Prolonged living at a high level of stress is what brings on the physical symptoms.

On the other hand, someone with AI doesn’t have that fight or flight response which allows us to power through and crash and burn at a time which suits us. We can’t ignore our physical symptoms because our bodies perceive stress as having been living at the prolonged stress level for years, even if the ‘stressful thing’ only happened a few seconds ago. We feel like we’ve been running from the bear for about 3 days. This is because we already have depeleted levels of the stress hormone, cortisol. When the bear starts staggering out of the bushes, bodies are supposed to release a lot of cortisol very quickly to get you into running mode. Ours doesn’t. It uses up what’s left in the tank and then doesn’t make anymore. That’s when we get the visual disturbances, migraines, stomach ache… etc which everyone else might get further down the line, except we can experience all of those in a matter of minutes. If other stressful things happen, we don’t take more meds to compensate or we don’t remove ourselves from the original stressor, that’s when it becomes life threatening. 

Realistically, I’d be saying ‘hold on Mr Bear, chase me by all means, but let me do my IM injection and stress dose and then I’ve got maybe a little bit of a chance in keeping up with the others running away.’ I’d get eaten basically!

All of this means that ‘stressful’ things to me are not what other people would consider stressful. There are many physical stressors to take into account, but these ones are purely emotional or psychological.

There’s the obvious ones like bereavement or serious shock. You know how people faint when they find out someone dies? But they usually come around? That’s the body draining of all cortisol (among other things) and fainting is the body’s way of righting itself and making more to help the system cope. Unless you stab me with my injection, I wouldn’t ever wake up. 

Another obvious one is confrontation or arguments. That seeing red or pounding in your ears? That’s your fight or flight. I get that but then I also feel like I want to be sick and pass out at the same time. I don’t even mean full on blazing arguments either, I mean basic things like someone being rude to me even if I haven’t done anything wrong. I find it hard to stand up for myself because of the reaction it has in me. I choose my battles.

Emotions in general. Everything feels exaggerated, even happy ones. Pregnant women spend a lot of time blaming their hormones or crying for no reason. It’s similar for me. Except if I cry too much I can make myself seriously ill, which then causes me more problems. This gets further compounded by the fact that low cortisol symptoms usually include depression, anxiety or paranoia, which cause ‘stress’ which causes more of the depression, anxiety and paranoia. Fun, right? 😉 Excitement also causes problems. Sometimes I find talking too animatedly makes me feel ill.

I don’t find practical jokes funny. If they’re designed to scare or get a specific response, my response would be adrenal crisis 9 times out of 10 rather than the hilarity that others would want. 

Information overload. Many of us have issues processing sound and light and noise quickly. So lots of that in one go or having a lot of verbal or written information given to us can trigger the non-existent fight or flight. 

Changes to plans. Because we spend so much of our time trying to manage our emotional and stress responses, we tend to overplan so we know what to expect. So on a bad day, changes to plans or the unexpected does actually count as a stressful event. 

There are probably more but I can’t think of them right now. We can learn to manage our emotions as best we can, but once the stress mechanism is triggered there is only so much we can do to control the response. It’s physiological as well as psychological. Telling me to get a grip will make it worse (hello paranoia). Shouting at me will make me like a red rag to a bull and it’s a slippery slope. It takes us a long time to recover. I’m talking hours and sometimes days depending on how many stressful things happened in a short period of time and how bad they were. 

Part of me finds all of this fascinating because the body is actually an incredible thing. But the other part wishes I hadn’t had to learn about it through experience! 

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2 thoughts on “‘Stressful’ Situations

  1. mayfield2034 says:

    As a fellow Secondary AI this is so true and trying to get some family members to understand just how different my body works to theirs has been a challenge. Great Post.

    Liked by 1 person

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